Why is the FDA silent? – The truth about pet food

Just a few years ago, the FDA alerted pet owners to a potential problem with pet food (the potential for stress). I July 2018the FDA informed the public that the agency is investigating a possible link between pet food and cases of canine heart disease.

Although this 2018 notice did not specifically state how many adverse event reports the FDA received related to canine heart disease, it appears from this first public notice — there were not many. “Medical records of four atypical DCM cases, three golden retrievers and one Labrador retriever, showed that these dogs had low blood levels of the amino acid taurine. Four other cases of DCM in rare dog breeds, a Miniature Schnauzer, a Shih Tzu and two Labrador retrievers had normal blood taurine levels.

With no known cause, and only a handful of consumer complaints – the FDA alerted the public that they were investigating a potential problem with the pet food.

This FDA public pet food alert was picked up by the media across the United States, which resulted in more incidents being reported to the agency. A year later, In 2019 The FDA said “Between January 1, 2014 and April 30, 2019, the FDA received 524 case reports of dilated cardiomyopathy.

Answering the question. Why the FDA decided in 2018 to alert the public to a potential pet food problemthe agency said:

The FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) felt the responsibility to highlight the signals we have been alerted to and to solicit reports from pet owners and physicians regarding relevant cases. can know about

Fast forward to today (1/17/24)…”SignalThe FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine has been notified today of…

In about a five-week time frame, the Facebook group One pet rescue at a time (Pet Owners and Animal Volunteers) There have been 957 reports of sick pets, of which 234 have died.

Starting today (1/17/24), FDA feels no obligation to shed light on the current issue and has not solicited reports from pet owners and/or veterinarians who may know of relevant issues.

It is not known how many reports of sick or dead pets have been submitted to the FDA, or if the agency has received more than the 957 reports submitted by this one group of pets.

Why don’t we know? Because unlike in 2018 (never confirmed) grain-free pet food has been linked to canine heart disease, The FDA is refusing to feel the same responsibility to warn pet owners as it did in the past.

The FDA is not releasing the information to anyone – including the mainstream media.

Why is the FDA handling this current situation differently?

Asked how many negative reports the agency has received about a potential pet food problem, the FDA is asking everyone (including the media) to file a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request that it receives. It can take months (even years).

But… while investigating a possible (and never proven) link between grain-free pet food and heart disease in pets, The agency made all reports publicly available.Without the need to file a FOIA request As the current concern of pet food needs.

In 2019, the FDA released brand names included in adverse event reports the agency received related to a possible (and never proven) link. Yet in this instance the FDA is completely silent on the brands involved.

The stark difference between how the FDA handled reports of sick/dead pets in 2018 and how the FDA is handling the current issue… is a surprise…

Is the FDA protecting the manufacturers involved in the current situation? or…

Are pet food manufacturers currently linked to pet illness and death not cooperating with the FDA? Perhaps pet food corporate lawyers are strongly suggesting that the FDA remain silent on this current issue?

We don’t know.

What we do know is that we need answers from the FDA.

Because the FDA is silent, pet owners are encouraged to write their representatives in Congress. Ask your representative to alert the FDA to pet owners what ‘signal’ they are currently seeing in pet food and what they are doing about it.

Email Example:

There seems to be a health issue with pet food right now. The number of individual pet owner reports of sick and dead pets collected by a volunteer group of pet owners continues to grow – to date the group has collected 957 reports of sick pets. Out of which 234 have died. The FDA has failed to keep American pet owners updated, refusing to disclose any information on how many reports of sick or dead pets the agency has received or on behalf of those pets. Investigating.

I am asking you to contact the FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine for answers. The FDA has alerted the public to various pet food safety issues in the past, and pet owners certainly deserve some answers now.


To find your representative in Congress, Click here.

On behalf of sick and dead pets, on behalf of their worried or grieving families, take five minutes to write to your representatives. The FDA can ignore us, but it won’t be so easy to ignore Congress.

Best wishes to you and your pets,

Susan Theakston
Pet Food Safety Advocates
AUTHOR BUYER BEWARE, CO-AUTHOR DINNER PAWsible
TruthaboutPetFood.com
Association for Truth in Pet Food

Become a member of our pet food consumer association. The Association for Truth in Pet Food is a stakeholder organization that represents the voice of pet food consumers along with AAFCO and the FDA. Your membership helps representatives attend meetings and raise consumer concerns with regulatory authorities. Click here To learn more

What’s in your pet’s food?
Is your dog or cat eating dangerous ingredients? Chinese imports? The Petsomer Report tells the ‘rest of the story’ on over 5,000 cat foods, dog foods, and pet treats. 30-day satisfaction guarantee. Click here To review the Petsumer report. www.PetsumerReport.com

Find a healthy pet food in your area. Click here

List of 2024
Susan’s List of Trusted Pet Foods Click here To learn more

2023 list of remedies
Susan’s List of Trusted Pet Treat Manufacturers Click here To learn more

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