The mistake pet owners are making could cost them $15K.

A stern warning has been sent to dog owners – do it. Fatal mistake And not only could you lose your pet, you could also be left with a $15,000 vet bill.

As the warmer weather arrived in November last year, Pet Insurance Australia (PIA) noted a tenfold increase in the number of heat stroke claims from policyholders compared to the winter months. More dogs Was left in hot cars. While the average amount claimed for heat stroke-related conditions over the past two years is $1,707, the highest claim paid to a Pet Insurance Australia customer was $15,000.

Nadia Creighton from the PIA told Yahoo News Australia “It’s a time every year when we just see a huge increase in heat stroke claims.” “I think it’s really important for people to remember that our pets can’t regulate their body temperature as well as we can, and if someone sits in a hot car and breaks the windows, even if it’s hot No matter what day it is, try it. Sit in it for five minutes and it becomes unbearable.

A car left outside Campbelltown Hospital in the Greater Sydney region had a picture of a dog on the front seat.  Source: Facebook

A car left outside Campbelltown Hospital in the Greater Sydney region had a picture of a dog on the front seat. Source: Facebook

He added that while humans are quite good at regulating their body temperature, No pets.. “There are also a lot of dogs around now that are very popular breeds, like French bulldogs and pugs, that fall into this brachycephalic breed, so their faces are pushed in. Those dogs can handle heat easily. “Can’t and so their risk of heat stroke is much higher than your average dog with a good nose.”

How do you get $15K?

Nadia said that when a dog overheats, it gets serious pretty quickly, because all their internal organs start to break down very quickly.

“So there will be treatments for heatstroke, whether it’s intravenous fluids, veterinary monitoring and things like that, and that may include some medications,” he explained. “It depends on how bad the heat stroke is.”

This is why people need to act fast if they notice any signs of heat stroke in their pets.

“The best thing to do is to call your veterinary clinic immediately, talk to the vet and tell them about the symptoms your dog is showing, such as excessive panting, shaking and grinding, while some Pets can actually have seizures.” Nadia said. “Go straight to your local veterinary clinic on the phone.”

Despite repeated warnings, children and pets continue to be left in hot cars.  Source: 7News/FacebookDespite repeated warnings, children and pets continue to be left in hot cars.  Source: 7News/Facebook

Despite repeated warnings, children and pets continue to be left in hot cars. Source: 7News/Facebook

Picture of a dog inside a hot car

The warning comes a day after a dog was abandoned in the Greater Sydney area. In a series of photos shared on social media, the pet can be seen lying in the front seat of a car parked outside Campbelltown Hospital on Thursday. The man who took the shots said “the police have been notified,” while Facebook users criticized the owner for leaving his dog behind.

“What’s wrong with some people, it’s so hot today,” one person wrote. “It’s shocking,” said another.

Others, however, insisted that the owner had done the right thing by rolling up the window, and that the dog was looking nice and “cool”.

Misconceptions about dogs in cars.

But Nadia argued that cracking the window “doesn’t matter”. “If you’re going to crack the window, you might as well leave it because studies have shown that it doesn’t make any difference to the temperature of your car,” he said.

And as for suggestions that the owner had only popped out for five minutes and would be back soon, Nadia insisted it wasn’t worth the risk.

“Let’s be honest, every time you think, ‘I’ll only be five minutes,’ you bump into people you know,” she said. “So that five minutes turns into 10 minutes and within 10 minutes your car is at a point where it’s completely unbearable.

“That’s why it’s so important to get the message out there. If you can’t take your dog with you, leave them at home.

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