Response to Colorado Pet Registration Fee Bill

A bill to create an online pet registry in Colorado has been shelved less than a week after being introduced. The state representative behind the bill is now responding after receiving death threats over the legislation.

(Colorado Springs, Colo.) – A bill to create an online pet registry in Colorado has been shelved indefinitely, less than a week after being introduced. The state representative behind the bill is now responding after receiving death threats over the legislation.

State Rep. Regina English, D-El Paso County, told FOX21 the original idea behind the pet tax was inspired by concerns about senior citizens and their pets. HB24-1163 There will be a way to ensure that someone is designated as the pet’s caretaker in case something happens to their owner, be it hospitalization or another emergency. Be the situation.


“I can say with confidence that this bill is dead,” said Representative English.

The proposed bill would recommend pet owners nominate a carer for their pet if the owner is unable to do so. If a designated caretaker cannot be located or refuses to take custody of the animal, the pet will be taken to an animal shelter.

According to the bill, the annual fee shall be fixed by the enterprise and shall not exceed:

  • $8.50 per animal with a designated caregiver
  • $16 per animal that is a dog or cat that has not been treated or assigned a caretaker.
  • $25 per animal without designated care

The proposed fee would be separate from other fees and registrations currently required by individual jurisdictions.

According to the bill, the system would be accessible only to first responders and the Department of Public Health and Environment.

“The goal was not to cause any financial hardship to the people of Colorado,” explained Rep. English. “So, the rhetoric and the hate that I’ve received and the threats to my life behind a piece of legislation that I myself wasn’t happy with is beyond me.”

Less than a week after Representative English introduced it, the bill was met with a major push.

“It was not a good bill in the state it’s in, and I can admit that,” said Representative English.

Dwayne Adams, President and CEO Humane Society of the Pikes Peak Region (HSPPR) opposed the bill. He believed that it essentially established a tax on pet owners and said that regulation of pets should be done at the local level rather than the state level.

“We don’t know where this bill came from, why it was brought in,” Adams explained. “No one has ever spoken to us, but I think the idea, the concept behind it, has merit and people should use this time to update their pet’s profile.”

There are currently licensing requirements for pets in the Pikes Peak region, HSPPR said, to align with its partner Bandit Pete.

“They can go to their pet’s profile page and even list their veterinarian there,” Adams said. “That kind of information is important to us when we end up with a stray and if we have a microchip, we can trace it. If you’re not available to respond, we know there’s an emergency. Who to contact in case of “

HSPPR also believes the bill would have created a barrier to pet adoption because it is an additional expense. Rep. English said that while the bill is not happening this legislative session, there are plans to continue.

“The conversation will still continue and hopefully we can come back with something better in a way where it’s not offensive to the people of Colorado,” Rep. English said.

The state lawmaker said the bill was a learning experience for him. Now she plans to use this legislative session to focus on student mental health.

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